Grass cheese, a true delicacy

Did any of you already hear talking about ‘grass cheese’? To be honest, neither did I until a few weeks ago.

Well it is actually very simple, Grass cheese is cheese made from the first milk of spring… What makes this milk so special is that normally in spring or when the starts to get better the cows, who have been in their stables for the whole winter, start eating grass again which gives a special flavor to a cheese. It gives a more creamy cheese with soft butterfat taste.

But the fact that it is softer a more creamy is pretty logical if you just think about the fact that the hay is dry and the spring grass is wet… so combo of the two makes more creamy result ….

You might even say that this kind of cheese kind of exclusive as it is only available a short period. Why? After a while the cows stomach get used to the grass and the cheeses are not that soft anymore. Most of the cheeses made with this kind of milk are available around end of April, beginning of May and usually for a very short period as the amount of cheese made is not enormous …

The North-Holland Gouda cheese made with Grass milk for example  will be available as of May 1st  as you like any other cheese, this cheese also has to set for a while in cooling cells. (in case of Grass cheese, ca. 4weeks) .

FYI, If you want to make sure you have an original Gouda cheese from North-Holland, check the Red label on the package!

Maybe you have to try both  the regular and grass cheese at the same time, as only then you can really tell the difference, and I’m sure you’ll agree that grass cheese is a true delicacy!

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